Business Building

Open-Ended Questions in Marketing Research

A good conversationalist knows that asking closed-ended questions is no way to make real friends.

Similarly, in marketing research, there are good survey questions, and there are bad ones.

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Marketing Project Management: A Reliable, Reusable Framework

Lurking beneath every goal are dangerous assumptions. The longer those assumptions remain unexamined, the greater the risk.

– Jake Knapp, Sprint: How To Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just 5 days

Imagine this scenario. You’re a marketer, and you’ve just launched a marketing campaign that you spent weeks or months building. You checked all your boxes:

  • You assigned roles and responsibilities.
  • You kept stakeholders informed along the way.
  • You activated all the right channels to reach your target segment.

But something is wrong. Hardly any prospects are opening your emails. Almost none are engaging with your ads. The only feedback you are getting is that certain elements on your landing page are broken and, worse, don’t load properly across devices and browsers. 

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Promo Videos: What Really Matters (with Examples)

Planning to create a promo video to increase conversions? Good idea.

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How to Create a High-Performing Analytics Team

Every company dreams about creating high-performing teams. For us at OWOX, that dream centered on our analytics department, which included 12 specialists—junior analysts, mid-level analysts, senior analysts, and QA specialists.

Collectively, our analysts were responsible for consulting clients on data analysis and improving our marketing analytics tool. While our company focuses on analytics, our challenge was not unique—many in-house marketing departments and agencies struggle to measure and improve the efficiency of their teams.

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10 Principles of Effective Pricing Pages

If you run a SaaS business or sell only one product (with some options), you probably have a dedicated pricing page for the whole thing. Here are 10 principles to get it right:

  1. Simple is best.
  2. Make it easy to compare.
  3. Help people choose a plan.
  4. Address FUDs.
  5. Offer currency options.
  6. Limit choice.
  7. Incentivize up-front payments.
  8. Add playfulness.
  9. Use a clear call to action.
  10. Tell them what happens next.
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How to Do a Competitive Analysis: A Step-by-Step Guide

“Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.” —Napoleon Bonaparte

When your competitors make mistakes, it makes winning so much easier. But what if it’s you who is making a mistake, while your competitors are off to the races? You won’t know until you figure out what your competitors are up to.

Knowing what the competitors are doing—how they’re thinking about the market, which tactics they’re using, how they’re crafting messages and design—can make all the difference in the battle for customers.

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SaaS Growth: The "Triple A" Sprint Framework that Gets Results

Many SaaS companies launch a product-led growth model—but never update it. When the executive team calls me and asks why they aren’t converting users into customers, I tell them to buy a plant. Seriously.

If they don’t water the plant, it’s going to wither and die. If they water it and give it sunlight, it’ll grow. Everyone knows how the system works. Yet, even though we know what to do, millions of plants still die. Why? Nobody takes ownership.

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Video Hosting Platforms: Which Is Best for Your Business?

Google “video hosting platforms,” and you’ll get about 50 million results, along with several paid ads. How do you choose the platform that suits your needs?

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bakery pricing

Pricing strategy can be one of the hardest things for entrepreneurs. How much should you charge for your product? How much is too much? Are you selling yourself short?

This article gives you crucial knowledge about four product pricing strategies and techniques.

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moat around castle

The concept of “economic moats” came from a 1999 Fortune article by Warren Buffett:

The key to investing is [. . .] determining the competitive advantage of any given company and, above all, the durability of that advantage. The products or services that have wide, sustainable moats around them are the ones that deliver rewards to investors.

Economic moats remain tethered to investing: A bigger moat makes a stock a better bet. But the implications are broader, for companies large and small.

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