Original Research

Price Perceptions of Products with Utility Vs. Hedonism Copy [Original Research]

Inspired by some great feedback on our Ecommerce Price Perception and Image Size Study, we wanted to explore price perceptions again, this time related to differing product descriptions.

Do consumers find more value in a blender that makes creamy smoothies and shakes, or a blender with 750 watts of power? What type of product descriptions depict a seemingly high-value product, hedonic ones or utilitarian ones? In this CXL Institute study, we test three different products to explore this question.

Keep reading »

How Users Read the NYTimes Website – 2004 vs. 2016 [Original Research]

We found an interesting, and rather old, eye-tracking study from 2004 and decided to try to replicate a part of it to see how it works today.

This study, conducted through CXL Institute, involved eye-tracking a couple homepages of the New York Times, one from this year, 2016, and one from 2004. Our primary goal wasn’t the comparison to the old study, rather it was to see what were the ‘priority viewing areas’ for how people process a news site and to see if ‘today’s users’ process the contemporary design differently than one from more than a decade ago.

Keep reading »

Internal Promotions vs Third-Party Banner Advertisements [Original Research]

We were asked recently about the effects of using internal promotions (e.g., a discounted product sold within the site) vs. third-party (from an outside business) banner advertising on web site clarity and visitor perceptions.

Our first study used the five-second test to examine whether ads on website homepages distract visitors from understanding a site’s purpose. This follow-up study looks for differences in user perceptions between ad types: internal promotions versus third-party ads.

Keep reading »

How Distracting are Banner Advertisements on Home Pages? A Case Study

We were recently asked about the effects of ads on website clarity and visitor perceptions.

So we conducted a study through ConversionXL Institute that explores ad distraction by looking at the effects of banner ads on message communication, performing five-second tests on the same site with increasing numbers of ads.

A follow-up test will look for differences in user perceptions in a case study between internal promotions vs. third-party advertisements.

Keep reading »

Does the Presenter's Paradox Actually Work in Digital Marketing? [Original Research]

When people weigh choices, the Presenter’s Paradox says they do so by averaging (not adding) the value of each item in a package.

This means if you add more items to a list or more products to a bundle, it could reduce the overall value perception (if the added items are deemed less valuable.

Research on this phenomenon is fairly scarce, though, so we decided to conduct a study through ConversionXL Institute.

We provide 3 perspectives: 1. we outline what products and lists two academic studies have tested, 2. we duplicate a product and list test with a larger sample size to try and replicate the findings, and 3. we then apply the test to six new products, three experiential products (travel package, hotel night, massage) and three physical products (camera, printer, kitchen mixer).

Keep reading »