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  1. Eric

    Hey Peep,

    Great post! My company is currently working on improving the landing page conversion rate for my B2C website, and I had a question for you.

    What benchmark data do you use for landing page conversion rates? I am trying to gather as much information as possible so I am curious to what you would consider a bad / good / great conversion rate?

    Reply
  2. Tzvi Harel

    Hi Peep,

    Great post and great results.
    Q- What was the time frame of the above cycle – I mean, how long it took from planing the 1st test till you got the results of the 6th one?

    Thanks
    Tzvi

    Reply
  3. Mike Schinkel

    Hi Peep,

    Helpful case study, thanks for making it so detailed.

    Question about Test #6 though. It’s not clear what exactly the winning variation (#3) consisted of? Would you mind describing it in more detail? It sounds like it was multi-page? Even better, screenshots for each of the different pages?

    BTW, the screenshot for Test #6 is small so it was really hard to see the details of the different variations.

    Thanks in advance!

    Reply
  4. Jesse Quist

    Great post peep…. when I first started learning about conversion rate optimization I was under the impression that A/B testing meant randomly changing elements on the page to see which guess wins… it’s always good to get a reminder that creating a hypothesis and learning about your audience is the main reason for testing, not just the wins… that point is illustrated very nicely here.

    Reply
  5. Matthew J Trujillo

    79.3% Opt in Rate is IMPRESSIVE.

    On thing that has really helped me out is keeping it simple. People like simplicity and don’t want to spend all day filling out a form and entering information. As of right now one of my landing pages is converting at about 60% which is still VERY good. There is always something new to learn good information once again.

    Regards,
    Matthew J Trujillo
    http://www.topinternetmarketingguide.net

    Reply
  6. I think it’s a great article. Personally I am still wondering whether to put my landing pages on the right of the page or left. ps. over 21% of conversion rate is an amazing achievement! I cant get more than 10% ehh.

    Reply
  7. Nicolas Solop

    Excellent way to explain a job well done. It’s always good to find great articles that explain the improvement of the conversion rate.

    Nicolas

    Reply
  8. Yassin

    Hi Peep Good post as usual,

    There is a book i read a while “100 secrets of ad agency” it’s a good read, you can find some nice tricks there.
    keep rocking our world. nice posts create owe conversion posts makes me wealthy.

    Reply
  9. Chris

    Working with a client that has 1MM page views /month gives you lots of visitors to study. It’s another matter if you have a business whose site only gets about 10k visitors /month. One can just run tests for longer periods of time, but this in of itself can introduce other variability (seasonality of buying and other factors that affect people’s interest in a product) Thoughts on this? How might one do testing differently?

    Reply
    1. Sam Murray

      Thanks for sharing that low traffic post. I’ve been looking for something like this for a while. Just signed up to Inspectlet, it will help me a lot.

  10. Stuart @ Gleam.io

    What sort of sample size were you testing these changes with? We’re considering testing similar changes soon & interesting how long it took to see any statistically signifance?

    Reply
    1. Peep Laja Peep Laja

      Hey
      Our criteria are

      – Test duration minimum 7 days (or 14 or 21 if statistical confidence not achieved, important to test full business cycle at a time, e.g. a week)
      – 250 conversions per variation (150 as absolute minimum if otherwise test would take ridiculously long time)
      – Aim for 95% confidence or more to declare a winner (if this not achieved by 250 conversions per variation, you have a failed test – meaning no significant difference between the variations)

  11. Amarjit Kapur

    What do you mean by ‘bottom of the funnel’ conversions? Does that mean sales? If yes, how do you record it?

    Secondly, what are the steps in the funnel? How do you setup the funnels?

    Reply
    1. Peep Laja Peep Laja

      In this case the funnel consisted of 5 steps: landing page, resume building steps, and finally a signature confirming that everything is correct. So bottom of the funnel conversions would mean people who went through the whole funnel. Top of the funnel is people who opted in from the landing page.

      We used Optimizely to track funnel performance, but of course Google Analytics too.

      Here’s a guide to setting up funnels: http://blog.kissmetrics.com/conversion-funnel-survival-guide/

    1. Peep Laja Peep Laja

      First round was done with Visual Website Optimizer, all the following tests with Optimizely (works better with long funnels).

    2. Rami El Chamaa

      Can you please expand on why you believe Optimizely works better with long funnels? I tried both and for me, overall, VWO is much more user friendly.

    3. Peep Laja Peep Laja

      I like VWO user interface better too (faster as well), but it reported inaccurate data for funnels.

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Case Study: How We Improved Landing Page Conversions by 79.3%