Psychology

Using Dual Process Theory for Higher Conversions

Designing your website requires a studied understanding of human behavior if you want to increase your conversions. Using psychological tactics in your design to appeal to potential customers can help do this, but you must first know how users’ decisions are made.

Daniel Kahneman presents two thought systems that can give marketers a framework for how to target their ideal clients through site design and get a major uplift in conversions.

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Beyond Reason: 8 Subconscious Marketing Techniques to Boost Sales and UX

According to research by Harvard Business School professor Gerald Zaltman, up to 95% of our purchase decisions are directed by subconscious mental processes.

As digital marketers, we know this intuitively. How many articles have you read that advised you to appeal to the emotional, irrational, subconscious part of the brain?

Despite this evidence, a majority of marketing efforts still focus on making logical appeals to a rational mind.

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Memory

Every company wants their visitors (i.e. potential customers) and customers to leave their site with a lasting positive memory. Of course, that’s much easier said than done when you consider technical issues, copy confusion, price barriers and the like.

If you want to bring a smile to people’s faces when they hear your company name, you’ll need to understand how memory works and how you can design for it.

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Your Users Are Frustrated - Here's a Way to Fix That and Make More Money

Ever scroll through a website and get irrationally angry? Maybe it was the slow loading time, the poor design, the frustrating lack of clarity – no matter the case, I’m sure you can relate.

Though you might not like to hear it, a substantial amount of your customers are going through the same thing on your site right now. This is inevitable. The real money comes from finding these common frustrations and fixing them.

But how?

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Does the Presenter's Paradox Actually Work in Digital Marketing? [Original Research]

When people weigh choices, the Presenter’s Paradox says they do so by averaging (not adding) the value of each item in a package.

This means if you add more items to a list or more products to a bundle, it could reduce the overall value perception (if the added items are deemed less valuable.

Research on this phenomenon is fairly scarce, though, so we decided to conduct a study through CXL Institute.

We provide 3 perspectives:

  1. We outline what products and lists two academic studies have tested,
  2. We duplicate a product and list test with a larger sample size to try and replicate the findings, and
  3. We then apply the test to six new products, three experiential products (travel package, hotel night, massage) and three physical products (camera, printer, kitchen mixer).

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