intermediate

Tabbed Navigation

One of my favorite UX quotes comes from Chikezie Ejiasi, UX lead at Nest.

He wrote: “Life is conversational. Web design should be the same way. On the web, you’re talking to someone you’ve probably never met—so it’s important to be clear and precise. Thus, well-structured navigation and content organization goes hand in hand with having a good conversation.”

Can tabbed navigation be clear and precise? Of course it can, which makes it a valid form of navigation and content organization. What matters, as with most things related to UX, is how you implement it and how you optimize it.

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Why Keyword Themes + Modified Broad Match = Winning PPC Strategy

Cutting out noise and creating a PPC strategy that drives business: it’s the goal of SEM professionals everywhere. So let’s talk about how to do that for real.

By combining ad group theming and modified broad keywords, you can create targeting that rewards you with qualified traffic right away. It’s a structure that rewards you again and again by delivering even stronger target keyword sets.

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Product Recommendations

Nowadays nearly every online shop utilizes some sort of product recommendation engine. It’s no wonder—these systems, if set up and configured properly, can significantly boost revenues, CTRs, conversion rates, and other important metrics.

Moreover, they can have considerable positive effects on the user experience as well.

This translates into metrics that are harder to measure, but are nonetheless essential to online businesses, such as customer satisfaction and retention.

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How to Use Personalized Content and Behavioral Targeting For Improved Conversions

If 500 different people go to Amazon.com, they each a different version of the home page. How come? It’s personalized! It’s no secret why Amazon does that: content personalization makes money.

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Survey Response Scales: How to Choose the Right One

How you design a survey or a form will affect the answers you get. This includes the language you use, the order of the questions, and, of course, the survey scale: the default values and ranges you use.

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Google Analytics 102: How To Set Up Goals, Segments, and Events

Some of you out there may find this Google Analytics feature overview to be mostly a review. That’s awesome! That means you’re really taking ownership of your data. However, if you’ve never used any of these features, only experimented with them a little, or aren’t sure you’re using them correctly, you should read on.

From the time you set up your account and put your tracking code on your site, Google Analytics starts to capture and display a lot of data.

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11 Low-Hanging Fruits for Increasing Website Speed (and Conversions)

Website speed matters. Fast-loading sites perform better on all fronts: better user experience, higher conversions, more engagement, even higher search rankings. If you’re after mobile traffic (everyone is), site speed becomes even more important. No one wants to download a 4MB website on their smartphone, but most sites are that way. Your website can be different.

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8 Ways To Measure Satisfaction (and Improve UX)

A good user experience equals more money. But how do we measure user experience? How do we know if it’s getting better or worse?

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Channel Partner Strategy: 7 Steps to a Successful Program

A 1,983% boost in annual revenue and 1,000% user-base growth within six months—all with no upfront costs. Can this be true? These are actual results that startup Ringadoc got from their channel partner program.

In today’s environment, if B2B organizations are going to make it, they need to grow sales. Partnerships can be a big help.

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Email Retargeting: How to Drive Awareness, Sales, and Loyalty

According to a survey that researched omni-channel commerce for small and medium-sized businesses, email is the key driver of both customer acquisition (for 81% of respondents) and retention (for 80% of respondents).

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